Monthly Archives: June 2013

Mikko Inkeroinen Leuku

The previous articles about leukus seem to be of interest to the viewers of this blog so I thought I’d like to post some more of them. Here are some photos of a beautiful leuku being created by Mikko Inkeroinen recently.  To learn more about the leuku visit the Index Page to see the other posts.

“The blade is made of carbon steel and the fittings are brass. The curly birch handle is coated with linseed oil and the sheath has the birch lesta to contain the blade and protect the user.   The tip of the blade is thin so it’s fast. The focus is on the front of the handle and the blade has a convex edge. This configuration is what makes the knife work.  My knife is a beautiful tool.”

MI 1

MI 2

MI 3

MI 4

MI 5

MI 7

MI 8

MI 9

MI 10

MI 11

MI 12

MI 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Markku Parkkinen

I was recently introduced to the work of Markku Parkkinen by Theo Eichorn who met Markku at Fiskars  Puukkopäivät (or knife day).  Markku is from Oulu  in the region of Northern Ostrobothnia and some of his puukko show the influence of the Lapland style.  Please visit his web page at http://markkuparkkinen.blogspot.fi

Thank you for posting here Markku, it’s a pleasure to meet you!

Markku Parkkinen:

“I’m 51-year old knife-maker from Northern Finland.
The zest for making knives started when my former co-worker persuaded me to make my very first knife. I started knife making in 2007. I started to forge blades in 2010. My skills have developed over the years through multiple ways: I have been learning with the professionals of the knife industry, something from the books and a little bit from the internet.

As an essential profession I am a carpenter, but I haven’t been doing carpenter’s work for years. I have been doing woodwork and other types of handcrafting for my whole life. My main hobbies are fly fishing and trolling. I have tied my own flies for fishing from early age and I finished my first fly tying courses in 1974. I have also been making wooden lures from 1978. I have been teaching woodwork, running fly fish lure tying and wooden lure courses for several years now.

I get the inspiration for my knives mainly from Scandinavian and Lapland styles.Sometimes I am inspired by more international knife designs, but I always give my own unique touch to my knife designs.

In Oulu,  the place where I live in, the tradition of knife making is relatively weak. A lot of people in our family are gifted in handcrafting, but as far as I know, I am the only one in our family who does blacksmithing.”

M13

M1

M4

M8

M5

M9

M11

Markku's favorite knife, his salmon trout knife.

Markku’s favorite knife, his salmon trout knife.

 

M15

Markku's user puukko.

Markku’s user puukko.

M16

M14

M17

M20

M10

M3

M22

M23

M29

M30

M31

Markku Parkkinen at work…

M24

M27

M35

M37

 

Puukko Gallery Part 2

New work from Pasi Hurttila,  Anssi Ruusuvuori and Joonas Kallioniemi.

Joonas Kallioniemi

Joonas 1

Joonas 2

Joonas 3

Joonas 4

Joonas 5

Joonas 6

The next four photos are of a puukko with a micarta handle:

Joonas micarta

Joonas micarta 2

Joonas micarta 3

Joonas micarta 4

Flame birch

Flame birch 6

Flamy birch 5

Joonas May 2013 8

Joonas may 2013 11

Joonas May 2013 5

Joonas May 2013 6

Anssi Ruusuvuori

Anssi Ruusuvuori. Ash burl, dur-aluminum, leather. ( hand forged 1080 carbon steel blades on all four of his knives shown here.).

Ash burl, dur-aluminum, leather. ( hand forged 1080 carbon steel blades on all four of his knives shown here.).

Anssi Ruusuvuori.  Ash burl, German silver, leather.

Ash burl, German silver, leather.

Anssi Ruusuvuori. Carbon fiber, German silver, leather

Carbon fiber, German silver, leather.

Anssi Ruusuvuori. Black alder burl, German silver, leather.

Black alder burl, German silver, leather.

Pasi Hurttila

Pasi Hurttila. Handforged 95mm silversteel blade, birch bark handle with brass bolsters.

Handforged 95mm silversteel blade, birch bark handle with brass bolsters.

Pasi Hurttila. Handforged 95mm silversteel blade, birch bark handle with brass bolster, moose antler spacers.

Handforged 95mm silversteel blade, birch bark handle with brass bolster, moose antler spacers.

Pasi Hurttila. Hand forged 95mm silversteel blade. Goat willow and curly birch handle with brass bolsters.

Hand forged 95mm silversteel blade. Goat willow and curly birch handle with brass bolsters.

Pasi Hurttila. Leuku with forged C60 carbon steel blade. Blade length 220mm, thickness appr. 4,9mm, 38-40mm wide. Scandi grind with secondary bevel.

Leuku with forged C60 carbon steel blade. Curly birch handle. Blade length 220mm, thickness appr. 4,9mm, 38-40mm wide. Scandi grind with secondary bevel.

Pasi Hurttila. Leuku same as above but with dyed flamed birch handle.

Leuku same as above but with dyed flamed birch handle.

Pasi Hurttila. Leuku same as above but with moose antler bolsters and spacers.

Leuku same as above but with moose antler bolsters and spacers.

Puukko Gallery Part 1

I am going to post photos of new work by the puukkoseppä featured on the blog, hopefully twice a year.  I would like to do this in the summer and again at Christmas time.  I will be posting the photos I’ve received over the next few weeks, enjoy!

Matti Luhtanen's toijala. Silver Medal winner at Fiskars this year.

Matti Luhtanen’s toijala. Silver Medal winner at Fiskars this year.

Pekka Tuominen's 1930s style puukko. A tribute to his grandfathers and all how fought in The Winter War. Show with his grandfather Laurie Tuominen's military items.

Pekka Tuominen’s 1930s style puukko. A tribute to his grandfathers and all who fought in The Winter War. Shown with his grandfather Lauri Tuominen’s military items.

Pekka Tuominen

Pekka Tuominen

Pekka Tuominen

Pekka Tuominen

Pekka Tuominen

Pekka Tuominen

Pekka's work for the show in Oregon, U.S.A.

Pekka’s work for the show in Oregon, U.S.A.

Saku Honkilahti

Saku Honkilahti

Saku Honkilahti

Saku Honkilahti

Saku Honkilahti

Saku Honkilahti

Saku Honkilhati. This one is the Lemminkäinen, puukko which is planned especially for bushcrafters and such who wants little bit more robust construction. It has little bit over engineering on the tang and little second bevel, both for incurance against hard jobs and also there is lanyard hole in the handle. And then there is all new consept for me, big knife (7" blade) with puukko and leuku influences, called Tiera.

Saku Honkilhati. This one is the Lemminkäinen which is made especially
for bushcrafters and those who want a little bit more robust construction.
It has a little bit over engineering on the tang and little second bevel,
both for insurance against hard jobs and also there is lanyard hole in
the handle.

And then there is all new consept for me, big knife (7" blade) with puukko and leuku influences, called Tiera.

Saku Honkilahti. His new knife, the Tiera, a big knife with a 7″ blade and leuku influences.

Mikko Inkeroinen's hattutuppipukko

Mikko Inkeroinen’s hattutuppipukko

Mikko Inkeroinen

Mikko Inkeroinen

Mikko Inkeroinen

Mikko Inkeroinen

Mikko Inkeroinen

Mikko Inkeroinen

Mikko Inkeroinen

Mikko Inkeroinen

Mikko Inkeroinen

Mikko Inkeroinen

Sami Länsipaltta

Sami Länsipaltta is a puukkoseppä from Rauma, Finland. Although he calls himself a “hobbyist” maker his work is anything but amateurish. Sami is an all around artist and craftsman who has a very keen sense of design and detail. He works in the traditional form but with his own unique style and choice of materials. The first puukko by Sami that I recall seeing was one made from a hockey puck and scrap steel. One of his most recent is made of stacked bicycle inner tube in place of birch bark. He uses curly birch and birch bark but likes to take chances and try new approaches. I really enjoy his work and am always looking to see what he’s up to next.

Sami’s website: http://www.lansipaltta.fi/en/

Sami’s blog: http://lansipaltta.blogspot.com/

Sami Länsipaltta:

“I have from an early age loved all kind of hand skills such as drawing, air brushing, lure making, woodworking, just to mention a few. In addition, I enjoy lure fishing and now and then in the autumn I go duck hunting also. So the puukkos, and various types of knives have always been part of these hobbies, but they were so obvious that I really never had paid them any particular attention.

Sometime in 2008, I saw a beautiful handmade puukko in one of the internet fishing forums, and I got the idea: “Why couldn’t I do that kind of puukko myself?”. In the autumn of the same year I signed up for a local Community College puukko course where the puukkos were made from stock blades. Puukko making was therefore a very “lucky” continuum to my previous crafts. Maybe there’s also some craftsmanship in my blood because my father has done woodworking, as well as being an art teacher in elementary school, and his father was a carpenter and farmer. I don’t know if there have been any blacksmiths or metal workers in my family.

As I said, I took the first steps to this great hobby in 2008. Right from the beginning however, I followed my own path and gathered more information mainly from the Internet, from the puukko literature as well as from other nearby courses. Finally, there came the moment that I just had to try to do the blades myself. I forged my first blade in 2010 and the first totally self-made puukko with my own blade saw the daylight at the end of the same year. Since then, I have forged all blades myself.  At the same time my relationship and appreciation to Finnish puukko has totally changed over these years.

I can’t say that I’m completely self-taught. I have received priceless advice and tips from many, even here introduced, bladesmiths. I also have to give a big thanks to the internet and, in particular to puukkosivut.net forum. It’s also always good to keep your eyes and ears open to new ideas and methods. The best advice I have received, especially on forging, was by listening and following the other black- and bladesmiths at work.

I think the essence of a puukko comes from its simplicity and minimalisim, in other words, the traditional design. Not to forget it’s usability. Simplicity is very difficult to achieve and perhaps the challenge lies right there. On the other hand you could say that the simple shapes and lines stem from somewhere deep in Finnish culture, such as Alvar Aalto’s and other great Finnish designers design. From time to time I am very pedantic and I am trying to focus on finishing and why wouldn’t I? This is a pure hobby for me, so I don’t have any time pressure. Because I make only 1-3 puukko a year, I always try to find or try to do something new and different. In addition, it’s also kind of fun play around with different materials, even a little different from the traditional that is usually seen in puukkos.

I have also noticed how a perfectly shaped and finished knife is nothing if it doesn’t have the proper blade. I have recently tried to search for information, and make experiments in forging and heat treatment and thus to improve the functionality as well as the quality of my puukkos. These experiments, however, hold back bit the fact that I don’t own my own forge.

Although this is just a hobby for me, and almost the only hobby in addition to my family at this time. It’s very wonderful to see that others have recognized my puukkos as well. So far the biggest tribute to my hobby has been the invitation to take a part Puukontekijät Exhibition organized by Professor Simo Heikkilä (known eg, Leuku Exhibitions). Maybe there was needed also one hobbyist among the 17 top bladesmiths?”

(The exhibition Sami refers to was at the Höyry Galleria in Korpilahti, Finland April 2013 ) http://hoyrygalleria.blogspot.com/search?updated-max=2013-04-30T14:58:00%2B03:00&max-results=7

Sami 3

Sami 4

Sami 14

Sami 15

Sami New

Sami new 4

Sami new 2

Sami new 3

Sami 18

Sami 25

Sami 26

Sami 27

The hockey puck puukko.

The hockey puck puukko…

...what he started out with.

…what he started out with.

This one has stacked bicycle inner tube in place of birch bark.

This one has stacked bicycle inner tube in place of birch bark.

Some of the material used in the puukko.

Some of the material used in the puukko.

sami 6

Sami 7

sami 8

Sami at the furnace.

Sami at the furnace.

Some examples of Sami’s drawings and fishing lures:

Sami 10

Sami 11

Sami 32

Sami 9

Sami 19

Sami 20

Sami 22

Sami 23