Tag Archives: Pasi Hurttila

A Visit To Finland

When my friend Federico Buldrini told me he was going to Finland to visit Pasi Hurttila I asked him if he would take some photos and write something for Nordiska Knivar. Here is his report. Thank you Federico and also to his brother, Fabrizio Buldrini for taking the photos.

21/8/16

 We’re going to hike in the Hammastunturi wilderness area. This area, spreading within parts of the three provinces of Inari, Kittilä and Sodankylä, was declared protected in 1991, after having been for centuries a wintering ground for reindeers bred by Inari Sámi and having being the scene of one of Lapland’s gold rushes, in this case from 1868 until the 1920s, with a few gold diggers still present today.

Pasi parks the van, we take our backpacks, he puts Pyry on the leash, makes Kumu wear a radio collar with GPS and we hit the trail. Actually there are no trails in this part of the reserve, so we proceed in a straight line on peaty soil, dotted with moss and streams and surrounded by pine trees.

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Moist, clean air, cloudy sky. Kumu runs away and after a while we hear him barking and yelping. When we reach him, he’s frantically digging and biting into the ground, where we find the remains of a lemming. Kumu has a bloody lip: the rodent hasn’t reached Valhalla without a fight.

Bogs, mosses, lichens, streams, pines, birches.

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While we continue the ascent we reach a clearing. A rusty saw hanging on a branch, a plastic sheet on the ground, strainers, pans, blankets and thermal trunks scattered.        It’s a local gold digger that has made his camp here.

We skirt a small river, we continue to ascend, and after half an hour we find a good place to make camp in a small clearing, a few meters from the stream. We are on top of a fell and within a circle of pines.

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Feathersticks and the fire flares up.

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While we eat it starts to rain softly and the wind rises, but the softshell and the raincoat are more than enough; the rain also doesn’t last more than fifteen minutes. Again on the trail while the sky clears and the sun rays fall.

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After half an hour we reach the summit, and we dominate a solitary and majestic landscape, sprinkled with birch trees and glacial erratics, kissed by the grazing light of the approaching autumn.

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The temperature rises slightly as we begin the descent. Bogs, streams, birch and pine. We are now in a slightly marshy valley, surrounded by forest and tunturit.

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After a woad we walk again among the trees, but the soil is still peaty and kind of elastic.

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We continue to go down, each one absorbed in his own thoughts…

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and around 6 p.m. we reach the road and the Toyota parked nearby. While we are loading the van with backpacks, collars and so on, with perfect timing, it starts to rain again.

 

22/8/16

 As decided yesterday, today’s program includes a visit to the Sámi Siida in Inari and a second hike.

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Upon entering in the museum you are greeted by the ticket office and the gift shop: books, plush, silver jewelry, knives etc. We walk along a ramp and reach a room with a chronological table that tells the prehistory and history of the Sámi, next to known major events of the rest of the world.

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The main room is divided in two and the themes are addressed through large explanatory panels, artifacts and some simple dioramas. On the outside it explores clearly and in detail the geology, flora, fauna and climate of Lapland, also illustrating the variations in hours of light, temperature and landscape throughout the year. In the inner part it explains crafts, hunting and fishing – conducted separately and exclusively by distinct Siidas (or tribes) the different costumes between a geographical area and another, the transition from nomadic to sedentary life. All this is achieved in a simple but very accurate way and, above all, without ever falling into the false “touristic” romanticism that the topic could easily inspire.

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Outside there is the original museum, composed of both originals and reconstructed buildings, which tell the life changes after the resignation from the nomadic life. Houses, farms, a court, a food storage cabin lifted off the ground, which was also the first installment of the museum at the time of its foundation, in the 50s. A little afar there are also few medieval looking traps for fur animals.

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After the visit we go back to Pasi’s cottage, we take our backpacks and step into the woods. The weather is grayer and more thoughtful than yesterday. Again we walk on a path covered with sphagnum, moss and peat areas. The forest here is a bit more disordered than on the Hammastunturi and on a couple of points the march is hampered by fallen pine trunks. The terrain itself is frequently wavy.

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After about an hour and a half, we pass yet another ripple and arrive on the shores of Lake Saarijärvi. Long lake, with jagged shores covered with sphagnum and dotted with small islands in the distance, hence the name. Everything is wrapped in a light mist. Autumn is breathebly in the air.

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We collect a bit of wood, we light the fire and prepare some tea with strawberries, embraced by the sweet moist and silent air of the taiga.

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Shortly before leaving, while the fire is dying out, we pick up a beer bottle that is already colonized by mosses, a clear sign that it has been abandoned there for several months

We keep up the ascent and get over the ridge of a hill.

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Pasi plans to continue in the forest to the cottage, but shortly after Kumu starts to chase something, maybe a fox and ends on the road. We follow him, and when he makes the move to even chase a group of reindeers that roam the forest edge, Pasi calls him back and decides to stay on the road

We conclude the hike walking the last stretch on the road.

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Maasepän Puukko Review by Federico Buldrini

Introduction

As explained in a post dating back to September 2012,  https://nordiskaknivar.wordpress.com/2012/09/15/1026/the maasepän puukko is the oldest and simplest of the puukkos styles and most likely has its origins in the Early Middle Age.
Basically used for everyday chores such as fashioning wooden household tools, preparing snares and traps for small game etc., it can be found in a variety of shapes all similar yet so different.
Here I’ll show and compare four different maasepän puukkos made by four different smiths, each of whom have a profile on this blog. (See the Index Page to learn more about these four puukkoseppä)
On my request they are all in the closest size range possible, but the makers had full liberty to choose materials and grinds following their preferences. All have a folded birch bark blade cover, a solution as old as the said puukko style and extremely practical for carving knives that don’t have to be carried on the belt.

Mas group

Mas group 2

Mas group 3

The smiths are listed in alphabetical order by surname.

Pasi Hurttila

blade
length 90 mm
width 21 mm
thickness 3 mm at spine, 4,5 mm at thickest point
steel Böhler K510
grind flat
edge angle 20°, with tiny microbevel
edge hardness ~ 60 HRC

handle
length 108 mm
width 29 mm max.
thickness 21 mm max.

weight
knife 85 g
with sheath 100 g

Overview

The blade was forged with a hand held hammer from Böhler K510 into rhombic shape, slightly tapered both in height and thickness. The heat treatment was made completely on the open fire of the charcoal forge, following the steel colour changing. After annealing and normalization the blade got a partial oil quenching followed by two temperings. Out of the box it was hair popping sharp.

The curly birch handle is simply epoxy glued over the tang. It fills the hand well. It’s slightly tapered toward both ends and is sanded with a medium grit, however avoiding any kind of roughness. It has a quite marked teardrop cross section.

The blade cover is crafted from 2 mm thick bark, simply folded and wrapped by a strip of the same material that keeps everything together tightly. The lightly scabrous surface of both the bark and the blade sides ensures excellent friction retention.

 

Martti Malinen

blade
length 85 mm
width 20,5 mm
thickness 3 mm at spine, 4,5 mm at thickest point
steel Ovako 100Cr6
grind flat
edge angle 20°, with tiny microbevel
edge hardness ~ 62 HRC

handle
length 112 mm
width 29 mm max.
thickness 22 mm max.

weight
knife 80 g
with sheath 85 g

Overview

The blade was forged from Ovako 100Cr6. The steel was flattened with power hammer then forged into shape with hand held hammer. It has rhombic section, rather strongly tapered in height but little in thickness. After annealing and normalization the blade was oven heated to 820° C, received a partial quenching in 60° C oil and was then oven tempered twice for two hours at 200° C. Out of the box it was shaving sharp.

The curly birch handle is glued over the tang mixing epoxy with some wood dust. It’s finished with a rather fine grit, it’s very lightly tapered towards both ends and fills the handwell. It has a very subtle teardrop section.

The blade cover is crafted from 1 mm thick bark, folded and wrapped with a strip of the same material keeping everything together. The lightly scabrous surface of both the bark and the blade sides give excellent friction retention.

 

Jani Ryynänen

blade
length 90 mm
width 22 mm
thickness 2 mm at spine, 4,5 mm at thickest point
steel ThyssenKrupp 80CrV2
grind flat
edge angle 18°, with tiny microbevel
edge hardness ~ 59 HRC

handle
length 110 mm
width 30 mm max.
thickness 21 mm max.

weight
knife 70 g
with sheath 75 g

Overview

The blade was forged with hand held hammer from 80CrV2 into rhombic shape with a hint of taper in height, while being extremely tapered in thickness. After annealing and normalization the blade was heated on the charcoal forge, received a partial oil quenching and was then tempered in an electric oven. Out of the box it was hair popping sharp.

The handle, made of curly birch, is epoxy glued over the tang in place. It’s finished with a quite fine grit, it’s very slightly tapered towards both ends and fills the hand well. It has rather chunky proportions and a very subtle teardrop section.

The blade cover is crafted from 1 mm thick bark, simply folded and wrapped by a strip of the same material that keeps everything together. The lightly scabrous surface of both the bark and the blade sides gives good friction retention.

 

Ilkka Seikku

blade
length 88 mm
width 21 mm
thickness 2 mm at spine, 4 mm at thickest point
steel W-Nr 1.1645
grind flat
edge angle 19°, with convexed edge
edge hardness ~ 61 HRC

handle
length 109 mm
width 27 mm max.
thickness 18 mm max.

weight
knife 75 g
with sheath 100 g.

Overview

This puukko, unlike the others, was made completely without the use of power tools.

The blade was forged with hand held hammer recycling an old feather file, the steel involved being a W1, into rhombic shape, quite tapered both in height and thickness. The heat treatment was made entirely on the open fire of the charcoal forge, following the steel colour changing. After annealing and normalization the blade got a quick water quenching, followed by a longer partial oil quenching, then tempered twice. Out of the box it was hair popping sharp.

The handle, made of cross cut curly birch, is hammered on to the sharp end of the tang and epoxy glued in place. Within the steel and the wood there are two birch bark strips, so to tighten even more the fit. It’s finished with a medium grit and fills the hand well, being more on the slimmer side, though. It tapers towards both ends and has a marked teardrop section.

The sheath, made from 1 mm thick bark, follows the same principle of the other blade covers, but goes almost all the way up the handle and has a birch double sided liner giving it strength. Good friction retention. This style of birch bark sheath is usually known as “Sami sheath”, but is actually widely used all around Finland.

In use

Having Jani’s puukko the thinnest edge of all, it suffered from some rollings quite easily during the first uses, so I decided to give it a tiny microbevel to avoid an unfair comparison; it was neatly done with DMT #600, #1200 and #8000, then stropping with both black and green Bark River compound.

All the puukkos were used for various tasks on different woods. As example I’ll show and comment here about how each one carved a white spruce butter paddle using only wood from a single plank.

Pasi: during the rough shaping I felt some light resistance when hollowing the handle belly
I had no problems during the rest of the work, even though this piece of spruce felt a bit more sticky than the ones I used with the other puukkos.
All the refining cuts were very smooth and produced nice and long curls.
Engraving was quite easy too.
At the end of all the edge was perfect and shaving, having only lost a little bit of aggressiveness.

Martti: during the rough shaping I felt some minor resistance when hollowing the handle belly. I had absolutely no problems whatsoever during the rest of the work.
All the cuts were very smooth, producing tight and long curls.
Engraving was quite easy as well.
At the end of all the edge was pristine and shaving, having only lost a little bit of aggressiveness.

Jani: during the rough shaping I felt some very minor resistance when carving the pommel and hollowing the handle belly. After this I checked the blade and could feel with the nail some kind of small rolling in the center of the blade, though it still shaved well. One minute of green compound fixed it
All the refining and smoothening carving was no problem at all, producing nice curls; at the end the edge was in the same condition as after the roughing and stropped again.
I wasn’t able to do engravings since, to avoid excessive weakness, the very tip is slightly rounded.

Ilkka: during the rough shaping I felt some minor resistance when hollowing the handle belly, while I had no problems whatsoever during the rest of the work.
All the refining cuts were very smooth and produced very tight and long curls.
Engraving was very easy, due to the tip geometry.
At the end of all I could detect four tiny microchips along the edge. I could feel them running the nail along the edge, but I couldn’t see them in any light. They were absolutely irrelevant during the work, the blade was still shaving sharp and everything was fixed with stropping.

Conclusions

What follows is a summary of the practical characteristics and general performances I got from each puukko.

A note on resharpening. All four puukkos were easy to sharpen using mainly DMT #1200 and #8000 grits, then stropping with Bark River black and green compound. I needed to use #600 grit only when adding the microbevel on Jani’s puukko.
None of them never took more than 20 minutes for a complete resharpening, more than half of this time being dedicated to stropping.
For me the easiest to work was 80CrV2, then W1 and K510 basically identical, then 100Cr6, slightly harder to grind due to the higher Cr content.

Pasi: excellent handle, with no problems whatsoever. It’s not too chubby nor too slim and has great liveliness in the hand.
The blade has an aggressive and homogeneous bite, sporting also a very good wood wasting power and a good resilience due to the tiny microbevel. Every cut has a clean and smooth finish, though generally the work piece may result just slightly faceted..
The tapered shape of the blade allows a very refined preciseness.

Martti: excellent handle, with no problems whatsoever. Even though being on the big side keeps a great agility in the hand.
The blade has the most aggressive bite of all, nevertheless keeping also an excellent wood wasting power and a good resilience thanks to the slightly convexed edge. As always with convex, it also gives a very smooth finish to every cut.
The tapered shape of the blade allows a very refined preciseness.

Jani: excellent handle, with no problems whatsoever. Despite its generous size it’s nevertheless very agile in the hand.
The blade has a very aggressive bite. Given the thin geometry it has a pleasing edge holding and stability: 80CrV2 resilience paid off and the microbevel did its job without taking away bite. The very acute geometry also tends to invite a generally faceted finish to the work piece.
Generally speaking the blade allows precise cuts, though sometimes its acuteness bites a bit too deep in the first place.
Maybe this puukko is a hair too light and the bevels are a bit too acute for fast and effective wasting of big amount of material, though the deep biting much compensated the light weight.

Ilkka: very good handle, with maybe a little too sharp belly. I only felt a bit of pain when using the chestlever grip during a massive wood wasting process, having quite a bit of material resisting the cut.
Apart from that the handle gives the puukko an extreme liveliness in the hand.
The blade has a very homogeneous bite, not too aggressive but very effective. Its acute geometry, paired with the convex bevels, gives a perfect balance between resilience and bite and, also, a very smooth finish to every cut.
The very shape of the blade allows a particularly refined preciseness and, last but not least, despite the light weight the convex grind allows great power during wood wasting.

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Pasi Hurttila Tuohipää Puukko Review

Pasi Hurttila Tuohipää Puukko Review
by Federico Buldrini

This puukko was hand made by Finnish blacksmith and craftsman Pasi Hurttila, native of Ulvila, but now living and working in Ivalo, 30 km from Lake Inari. Before dedicating himself to full-time blacksmithing he has been a wilderness guide for 10 years around Lappland and is still an eager hunter.
In his own words his goal is: “to craft effective tools, not microscope proof knives”. In addition to knives he forges all kinds of iron objects: from a nail to a railing.

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Technical Data

All the measurements I’ll give are just of this specimen and have to be taken just for it. Since every puukko is individually made measurements will change slightly.

Blade
length: 97 mm
wideness: 23 mm
thickness: 3,5 mm at spine; 5 mm at thickest point
tang: 10×5 mm thick at peening
steel: Böhler K510
grind: flat
edge angle: 20°, with tiny microbevel
edge hardness: ~ 60 HRC

Handle
length: 110 mm
width: 30 mm max.
thickness: 21 mm max.

Weight
knife: 140 g
with sheath: 180 g

Overview

The knife comes simply enveloped in a paper sheet. The name Tuohipää means birch bark handle.The rhombic section blade was forged with a hand held hammer from Böhler K510, or “silversteel”, the European equivalent of Japanese Aogami “blue steel”.

Out of the box it was hair popping sharp.The heat treatment was made completely on the open fire of the charcoal forge by following the changing of the steel colour. After annealing and normalization the blade gets a partial oil quenching followed by two temperings.

Due to the nature of the handle the tang is wider and thicker, so the stacked bark is more sustained and the handle is unlikely to bend under harsh use, which may happen with a smaller tang.The handle, composed of stacked birch bark flaps compressed between two 5 mm thick brass bolsters, has a smooth and velvetly feeling, while being very grippy:
As I have already said in previous reviews, birch bark, naturally filled with essential oil, is waterproof and almost neutral towards shrinking from humidity changes. It’s texture provides a very firm grip whatever hands are tired, bloody or moist and gives always a warm feeling. The handle has a quite marked teardrop cross section.

The sheath was hand stitched from 2 mm thick cowhide and the leather of the mouth is folded inside so to increase the friction retention.It has a two sided birch protective liner, which was carved with this same puukko and a chisel.
The belt loop is attached with a triangular D-ring allowing great steadiness during walking but also leaving to the sheath the possibility to be easily moved away when needed. The only ready made part of this puukko is the brass button that closes the belt loop.

In Use

As stated the puukko alone weights 140 g, just a hair less than the Fällkiven F1. That’s not really light for a puukko, nevertheless, it’s still light enough on the belt and in the hand.

Keeping up the usual bird carving, this time I’ll do an arctic loon which, together with the red-throated loon, regularly nests around Lake Inari.
Now, I saw another piece from our four years seasoned oak and draw the bird shape. I then shave the upper side of the block and cut wood chips so to get nearer and rough out the back of the loon, I rough hew the throat too, then I carve the head and the neck. I finish by refining the throat.
Generally the loon was slightly trickier to carve than the goldeneye, especially due to the very small surface I could grip on to hold the work piece during the head carving.

Conclusions

No comfort problems were detectable all throughout the two and a half hours this work took me. The handle teardrop section, compared to the more hand filling oval one, gives to the knife increased agility and fluidity of control, while still leaving good substance to the handle.

The blade always kept a uniform bite “style” and a good agility in the tiny spaces of the loon back/neck junction, despite its width and almost absent taper. Due to its microbevel, just a hair bigger than the Malinen Koivumäki’s one, I noticed a bite just a little less deep, compensated by a slightly higher control over the wood quantity to be cut. This is actually noticeable if you have both puukko to compare.

At the end of all the edge was absolutely perfect and still shaved hair with just a little pressure.

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New Work From The Puukkoseppä

The long days of summer are upon us and everyone is spending time out of doors so the postings on Nordiska Knivar have been sparse lately.  However, I would like to show you some recent work by some of the puukkoseppä who have been profiled here. Check back to this page from time to time in the next days and weeks because I’ll add more photos as I receive them.

There will also be some upcoming posts written by Federico Buldrini in the near future.  Thank you for your interest, if you see any puukko or leuku that you like here, please check that maker’s profile for more information and feel free to contact them.

Pasi Hurttila

A brand new one from Pasi, just finished today.

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Anssi Ruusuvuori

 Table puukko: ten layers of varnish over torn pieces of photographs, magnet inside.

Table puukko: ten layers of varnish over torn pieces of photographs, magnet inside.

 

Ilkka Seikku

Something special from Ilkka:

“The customer wanted a long and narrow blade for cutting fish and some shapes in the handle to secure the grip while cutting slimy fish.
Traditional materials, traditional way of making and looking like a puukko.
The rest I can make as I want. So, I made it traditionally, without any power tools. Heat treatments were made with living fire, trusting my own eyes. Just like real smiths have done before the electric oven.
Materials;
Blade: an old file
Handle: cross cut curly birch
Bolster: moose antler
Sheath: thick cow hide with wooden insert.”
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SAMSUNG
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Rauno Virtanen

The official Heinola 175th anniversary puukko.

The official Heinola 175th anniversary puukko.

 A traditional 'emännän veitsi' knife of woman for kitchen and garden.

A traditional ’emännän veitsi’ knife of woman for kitchen and garden.

Markku Parkinen

FEghOyQk4GtCyFgIa1-rz4LUIbqhjDKX0JoN0fqXFCXw4srGZAuKOQzbJN_j  MP 2

MP 3

MP 4

 

Pasi Hurttila

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Tapio Syrjälä

Tapio 1

Tapio 2

Tapio 3

Tapio 4

Tapio 5

 

 

 

 

 

Making A Leuku by Pasi Hurttila

I am pleased to be able to present this work in progress piece by Pasi Hurttila. He has written about the leuku for this blog and his work has been shown here before. (See Index Page) I admire Pasi’s work,  especially  his leukus. They are of traditional design and executed to the highest standards of craftsmanship. They are not only very fine tools, they are works of art. I’m able to say I own one of Pasi’s leukus with moose antler fittings and it is one of my most prized possessions.

For Pasi’s article about the leuku go to:  https://nordiskaknivar.wordpress.com/2012/10/20/leuku-part-two-by-pasi-hurtilla/

Pasi Hurttila’s work can be found at Lamnia.fi:  http://www.lamnia.fi/items.php?lang=en&gid=1&mid=354

Also, visit his website: http://www.hurttilanpaja.suntuubi.com/

Thank you Pasi for allowing me to publish this work in progress piece!

Pasi Hurttila:

“This work in progress follows the making of my two leuku models, one with brass and curly birch, and the other with elk antler and curly birch.

The blade starts its life as a bar of 80CrV2 carbon steel. Heating is done in a charcoal forge and all forging is done with a hand held hammer. (I forge 22cm leuku blades from 34x5mm bar.)

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Tang forged.

2

The blank is cut off and the shape of the blade is forged. The spine is left curved downwards, to give compensation for bevel forging.

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Spine straightens out as forging of bevels goes on.

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Bevels are forged in, tang and the whole blade is straightened, and bevel forging is finished. Blade is normalized and left to cool buried in ashes on the side of the forge.

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Blades are roughly ground before heat treating, then hardened by quenching in oil, and tempered twice.

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Blades sanded, sharpened, and polished.

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Several tests are done on each blade, on elk antler and wood. Batoning, chopping, carving, scraping, and drilling with the tip. After testing blades get final polishing.

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Materials for moose leuku; antler, curly birch, leather spacers. Antler bits are always cut about a week before making the handles, as usually antler shrinks a bit after it’s cut in pieces and the surface is sanded.

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Antler bits are flattened and leveled on a piece of sandpaper.

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Fitting is done by a drill and needle rasps.

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All parts of the handle are fitted and roughly shaped before gluing.

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Parts are assembled on the tang, with the glue in. Handle is tightened by peening, no press used. Peening is done so firmly that any parts won’t move when glue is still open. Peened end of the tang is filed down.

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When the glue has set, handles are shaped with coarse grit. Securing screws are added and heads are sanded down. Final sanding of the handle is done.

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Birch wood liners are made by using a hand saw, knife and chisel, finished by sanding.

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Handles of brass and curly birch are soaked in boiled linseed oil overnight. On handles with antler parts the oil is brushed several times on wooden parts only.

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Sheath making begins with taping the edge of the blade and wrapping knife in plastic wrap.

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A rectangular piece of leather is cut, mouth part is thinned and folded. Leather is soaked in water to make it soft, and stitching starts from the mouth.

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After the sheath has dried for a while, knife is pulled out, belt loop holes are cut, and knife is sheathed again with a belt loop strap on the place. Leather is smoothed with a bone spatula, and decorations are embossed.

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Seam is glued and trimmed, Sheath is dyed and waxed. Knife gets final polishing, some wax on the handle, and it’s ready to go.”

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Here are a few photos of the leuku Pasi made for me.

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November 2013 024

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November 2013 025

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Pasi's mark.

Pasi’s mark.

© Pasi Hurttila  2013

Tuohipää / Stacked Birch Bark Puukkos

The first puukko I ever owned was an Iisakki Järvenpää Aito which has a stacked birch bark handle. It was given to me as a gift and I was taken with it. I’d never seen a puukko before and I thought it was just about the perfect knife and the perfect design. I was especially impressed with the birch bark handle, reminiscent of some stacked leather handled American hunting knives. Except the birch bark was nicer, it had a soft velvety warm feel and was easy to grip. The knife was a pleasure to handle.

I found that the use of birch bark  is traditional in Finland, and it’s used on several styles of puukkos and is very popular. As I got to know some puukkoseppä through this blog I was able to learn how these puukkos are made and post some tutorials of how it’s done. This post is simply to show some very nice puukkos with stacked birch, an appreciation of the form. The ones featured belong to my friends Bill Lecuyer (who started me off with the gift of that Järvenpää Aito) and Federico Buldrini who has written several features for this website.

Thank you to Bill, Federico and the talented puukkoseppä for making them! Look at Index Page to learn more about these knives and how they are made.

From Bill Lecuyer:

This puukko is by Pekka Tuominen. Blade length 90 mm, handle length 105 mm.

This puukko is by Pekka Tuominen. Blade length 90 mm,
handle length 105 mm.

2B

3B

4B

5B

6B

Blade length 85 mm, handle length 110 mm.                                                                                 Handle length 11 cm

Kullervo puukko by Veikko Hakkarainen of Tapio, Rovaniemi. Blade length 85mm, handle length 110 mm.

9B

10B

11B

13B

14B

From Federico Buldrini:

Puukko by Pasi Hurttila. blade: 97x23x5,2 mm, rhombic handle 110 mm tang at peening: 10x4,5 mm

Puukko by Pasi Hurttila. rhombic blade: 97x23x5.2 mm,
handle 110 mm,  tang at peening: 10×4.5 mm.

F2

F3

F4

F6

F5

Pasi Hurttila, 100x22x5,6 mm blade, 110 mm handle, 9x5 mm tang at peening.

Another one by Pasi Hurttila, 100x22x5.6 mm blade, 110 mm handle, 9×5 mm tang at peening.

6F

2F

3F

5F

4F

Two of mine:

Joonas Kallioniemi puukko. Blade 95 mm, handle 105 mm.

Joonas Kallioniemi puukko. Blade 95 mm, handle 105 mm.

J 4 3

J2

J3

July 2013 039

J5

Puukko by Saku Honkilahti. Blade 90 mm, handle 105 mm.

Puukko by Saku Honkilahti. Blade 90 mm, handle 105 mm.

S4

S2

S3

S 7

S6

The Iisakki Järvenpää Aito that was the start of it all...

And the Iisakki Järvenpää Aito that started it all…

...thank you Bill!

…thank you Bill!

Puukko Gallery Part 2

New work from Pasi Hurttila,  Anssi Ruusuvuori and Joonas Kallioniemi.

Joonas Kallioniemi

Joonas 1

Joonas 2

Joonas 3

Joonas 4

Joonas 5

Joonas 6

The next four photos are of a puukko with a micarta handle:

Joonas micarta

Joonas micarta 2

Joonas micarta 3

Joonas micarta 4

Flame birch

Flame birch 6

Flamy birch 5

Joonas May 2013 8

Joonas may 2013 11

Joonas May 2013 5

Joonas May 2013 6

Anssi Ruusuvuori

Anssi Ruusuvuori. Ash burl, dur-aluminum, leather. ( hand forged 1080 carbon steel blades on all four of his knives shown here.).

Ash burl, dur-aluminum, leather. ( hand forged 1080 carbon steel blades on all four of his knives shown here.).

Anssi Ruusuvuori.  Ash burl, German silver, leather.

Ash burl, German silver, leather.

Anssi Ruusuvuori. Carbon fiber, German silver, leather

Carbon fiber, German silver, leather.

Anssi Ruusuvuori. Black alder burl, German silver, leather.

Black alder burl, German silver, leather.

Pasi Hurttila

Pasi Hurttila. Handforged 95mm silversteel blade, birch bark handle with brass bolsters.

Handforged 95mm silversteel blade, birch bark handle with brass bolsters.

Pasi Hurttila. Handforged 95mm silversteel blade, birch bark handle with brass bolster, moose antler spacers.

Handforged 95mm silversteel blade, birch bark handle with brass bolster, moose antler spacers.

Pasi Hurttila. Hand forged 95mm silversteel blade. Goat willow and curly birch handle with brass bolsters.

Hand forged 95mm silversteel blade. Goat willow and curly birch handle with brass bolsters.

Pasi Hurttila. Leuku with forged C60 carbon steel blade. Blade length 220mm, thickness appr. 4,9mm, 38-40mm wide. Scandi grind with secondary bevel.

Leuku with forged C60 carbon steel blade. Curly birch handle. Blade length 220mm, thickness appr. 4,9mm, 38-40mm wide. Scandi grind with secondary bevel.

Pasi Hurttila. Leuku same as above but with dyed flamed birch handle.

Leuku same as above but with dyed flamed birch handle.

Pasi Hurttila. Leuku same as above but with moose antler bolsters and spacers.

Leuku same as above but with moose antler bolsters and spacers.