Monthly Archives: March 2018

Taskupuukko

I’ve recently seen a new growing trend in crafting taskupuukko, small “pocket” puukkos that will work in the same range of duties of folding penknives and EDC folders: opening letters and packages, some food preparation, small wood working etc.

The origin of small and stylish pocket knives in Finland is probably trackable back to the 19th century, while small and rustic wood working knives have been around since the Middle Ages.
During the 19th century these stylish pocket knives were produced both by craftmen and factories and could be both simple and decorated. The more fancy and decorated models were either completely hand crafted by a knifemaker or a goldsmith could be asked to decorate a more basic knife.

Given the great popularity they had there isn’t a single style, but generally speaking, the most common characteristics were and still are a three fingers handle, more rarely a four fingers one, and a blade no longer than 6 cm, with a mostly straight edge and just a slight upsweep close to the tip.

Federico Buldrini

pasi jaakonaho 1

Pasi Jaakonaho

pasi jaakonaho 2

Pasi Jaakonaho

arto liukko 1

Arto Liukko

arto liukko 2

Arto Liukko

arto liukko 3

Arto Liukko

arto liukko 4

Arto Liukko

mikko inkeroinen 1

Mikko Inkeroinen

mikko inkeroinen 2

Mikko Inkeroinen

mikko inkeroinen 5

Mikko Inkeroinen

mikko inkeroinen 4

Mikko Inkerionen

jani ryynänen

Jani Ryynänen

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Antti Mäkinen

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Antti Mäkinen

otto kemppainen

Otto Kemppainen

 

lauri karjunen 3

Lauri Karjunen

lauri karjunen 1

Lauri Karjunen

saku honkilahti 2

Saku Honkilahti

saku honkilahti 1

Saku Honkilahti

harri merimaa

Harri Merimaa

 

 

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Markku Teräs

Markku Teräs

“In 2010 I was studying to be a wilderness guide and in the school there was also a knife making course. That was my very first time at the forge. I made my first fire striker as well as first puukko. The puukko was actually more or less a huge leuku style puukko with 22 cm blade. I gave that leuku to a friend who still uses it to handle moose skins.
I’m the very first and only knife maker in my family and I’m more or less self-taught, however, in the beginning I spent Friday evenings with old blacksmiths who were the expert in Tommi puukko making. They taught me the very basics in forging as well as how to forge a diamond blade. Over the years, I have developed my own style, a bit rough looking blade. The most important for me is that the blades are forged and holds the sharpness a long time.

I have lived 20 years in Lappland and for sure there are influence in my puukkos from those years. I also try to follow as authentic models of puukko as possible and take my inspiration from Viking culture, from different archaeological findings. Thus I like to use pure natural materials for handles like very curly birch, birch bark and moose antler.

Now I’m working full time as a craftsman. I make all kinds of Viking style products like bronze jewelry, Viking knives, fire strikers, Viking casts etc. I spend a lot of time to come up with always better blades every single time. I never settle with the thought that something is good enough already, I always look forward for going one step further and be a little better every time. I continuously want to try new things, sometimes with huge success sometimes with just good results. I try to keep in my mind that 80% of my work should be productive work and 20% innovative work, when I give my imagination a full speed ahead.

I also want to challenge myself, not just forging easy high carbon steels like 80CrV2, I mainly use old Finnish files and bearings. I’m extremely fond of the old files and how to forge a blade from it. If I may choose one of my own puukko, it will for sure have a blade made out of a file.

What I do in my free time is hunting, fishing, ice swimming, hiking, cross country skiing and go out with my three wolfdogs. In Summer time I mostly spend time in Viking and medieval markets and happenings. I’m a very active person and don’t really sit down at all.”

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Markku Teräs

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Markku Teräs